FAQ

Frequently Asked Questions

Why are you running for mayor a third time?

I am running for Chicago mayor because many people demanded that I run. I am experienced and the the person most qualified to bring about the change Chicago desperately needs.

Should a person that has run and lost run again?

Richard M. Daley, a prominent member of the most powerful political family in Chicago’s history — heir apparent to the office, the son of King Richard the Boss, a privileged politician, with 100% name recognition — did not win the first time he ran for mayor. Despite all of his assets, Legacy, Money and Machine backing, Daley had to run twice.

Didn’t Harold Washington win on his first try for Mayor?

No Harold Washington first ran for Mayor in 1977. He got less than 5% of the vote. Upon his second attempt at the Mayor’s office, Harold received 34% of the vote and won the 1983 Democrat Primary over Jane Byrne and Richard M. Daley. The State Legislature has since replaced Chicago Primary elections with a Municipal General election. To win one must now get at least 50% plus one vote.

If you didn’t win the last two times, why should people support you a third time?

I did not fail to do something commonly done or easy to do. In the last 181 years the people of the City of Chicago have only been able to elect one Progressive candidate for Mayor. Our historic election of Harold Washington stands as the only time we have been able to accomplish this monumental task. Harold had to run twice in order to win. History teaches us that persistence pays off. People should evaluate and compare our message and our overall campaign to that of the other contenders, and decide if I am the candidate most deserving of their support.

What will you do differently this time?

Each election year is different. In addition to the different cast of candidates, there are new or different voters who haven’t yet heard our message. The race itself is different from the 2011 mayor’s race for an open seat. Fewer people are willing to challenge an incumbent Chicago Mayor. This election, we will gain the support of many more of Chicago’s Business leaders, Religious leaders and Community leaders.  We will also use Social Media more effectively.

Why did you run for Governor?

My dry political run for Governor of Illinois was in response to the community call for a candidate to present a view different from the 9 White male candidates. Anyone who has run for public office will tell you it is a major sacrifice. It is quite difficult to travel downstate, 5 hours in a car to participate in a one hour discussion. You don’t do it for attention because the people who matter most to you never hear about it on the news. However, if Blacks and other Progressives are not involved in the discussion, our concerns will never be addressed. You certainly don’t do it for the money because the main people you seek to represent rarely give any or have any to give.

What have you been doing since the last election?

Since the 2011 election, I have remained extremely active. Working with STOP, I opposed and fought Rahm’s efforts to close Chicago’s Mental Health Clinics; Spent numerous days down at the Chicago Board of Health appealing for programs for the disadvantaged; I spent time in City Council Committee meetings fighting school closures; I’ve spent time helping to organize teachers and custodial workers victimized by school closings; I helped to launch Just Unity, a coalition organization which is currently working to register 100,000 new voters in Chicago; Tio Hardiman and I fought Rahm Emanuel and Superintendent McCarthy in an attempt to get them to remove Commander Evans. When they refused we pressured State’s Attorney Alvarez to file charges against him. She succumbed to the pressure and Rahm and MCCarthy were forced to do as we had demanded; We have held meetings regarding our initiative “Grocers Community Owned and Operated” a viable solution to the Food Deserts which plague the Black Community; We have been working to force the police to increase the number of quality arrests of those persons suspected of committing murders in our community; Fighting along with organizers on the Southeast side and in Altgeld Gardens to defeat efforts to lift the moratorium on landfill development; Organizing to present solutions for Pension reforms. Fighting for an increase in Accessible Taxi Service for the Disabled.

What Legislation have you helped to pass?

HB3881, a bill that passed the Illinois House on Wednesday, May 30. 2012, banning new or expanded landfills in Cook County until 2025. This was an issue that IEC affiliate Southeast .Environmental Task Force and People for the Community Recovery were actively engaged on because this landfill would be placed in an highly polluted industrial area that residents are working to revitalize; Reduced the Chicago Mayoral candidate signature requirement from 25,000 down to 12,500; Changed numerous rules at the Chicago Board of Elections.

Why do you say there is a mainstream media effort to Black Out Black Men?

There is a concerted effort mainstream media effort to “Black-out Black men” so one surely does not run for Chicago Mayor they want to appear on the 5 O’Clock news.

What do you find to be most difficult about running for office?

Knowing that on any given day, there are more people sharpening knives to stick in your back, than people seeking to lift you up.

Each election year is different. In addition to the different cast of candidates, there are new or different voters who haven’t yet heard our message. The race itself is different from the 2011 mayor’s race for an open seat. Fewer people are willing to challenge an incumbent Chicago Mayor. This election, we will gain the support of many more of Chicago’s Business leaders, Religious leaders and Community leaders.  We will also use Social Media more effectively.

Why did you run for Governor?

My dry political run for Governor of Illinois was in response to the community call for a candidate to present a view different from the 9 White male candidates. Anyone who has run for public office will tell you it is a major sacrifice. It is quite difficult to travel downstate, 5 hours in a car to participate in a one hour discussion. You don’t do it for attention because the people who matter most to you never hear about it on the news. However, if Blacks and other Progressives are not involved in the discussion, our concerns will never be addressed. You certainly don’t do it for the money because the main people you seek to represent rarely give any or have any to give.

What have you been doing since the last election?

Since the 2011 election, I have remained extremely active. Working with STOP, I opposed and fought Rahm’s efforts to close Chicago’s Mental Health Clinics; Spent numerous days down at the Chicago Board of Health appealing for programs for the disadvantaged; I spent time in City Council Committee meetings fighting school closures; I’ve spent time helping to organize teachers and custodial workers victimized by school closings; I helped to launch Just Unity, a coalition organization which is currently working to register 100,000 new voters in Chicago; Tio Hardiman and I fought Rahm Emanuel and Superintendent McCarthy in an attempt to get them to remove Commander Evans. When they refused we pressured State’s Attorney Alvarez to file charges against him. She succumbed to the pressure and Rahm and MCCarthy were forced to do as we had demanded; We have held meetings regarding our initiative “Grocers Community Owned and Operated” a viable solution to the Food Deserts which plague the Black Community; We have been working to force the police to increase the number of quality arrests of those persons suspected of committing murders in our community; Fighting along with organizers on the Southeast side and in Altgeld Gardens to defeat efforts to lift the moratorium on landfill development; Organizing to present solutions for Pension reforms. Fighting for an increase in Accessible Taxi Service for the Disabled.

What Legislation have you helped to pass?

HB3881, a bill that passed the Illinois House on Wednesday, May 30. 2012, banning new or expanded landfills in Cook County until 2025. This was an issue that IEC affiliate Southeast .Environmental Task Force and People for the Community Recovery were actively engaged on because this landfill would be placed in an highly polluted industrial area that residents are working to revitalize; Reduced the Chicago Mayoral candidate signature requirement from 25,000 down to 12,500; Changed numerous rules at the Chicago Board of Elections.

What about those who say you run for office simply to be seen?

There is a concerted mainstream media effort to “Black-out Black men.” So one surely does not run for Chicago Mayor because they expect to be seen on the 5 O’Clock news.

What do you find to be most difficult about running for office?

Raising the money necessary to address and fully present the issues important to the 99%. The Pinstripe corporate types, bankers, venture capitalist, and big business interest who directly benefit from city contracts make millions, many receive no-bid deals structured by the mayor. These are the same people who have contributed $30 millions to Rahm’s campaign war chest, to bolster his re-election efforts. Most of the 99% live paycheck to paycheck and do not have much money to contribute to a campaign, especially during the during the early, formative stages. The media has not yet learned how to assign value a  people campaign which relies upon volunteers. Those volunteers do work equivalent to that done by paid campaign staffers. The only real difference is the amount of money a peoples campaign has for mass media advertising. Furthermore, mainstream media does not yet know how to assess and value social media presence and the effectiveness of such messaging.